Top Financial Tips for Millennials

Are you a millennial who feels overwhelmed trying to manage your finances? Are you getting the most out of your money? Financial literacy is not often taught in schools and they don’t do a great job preparing their graduates to manage their finances. So when you’re out of college and start real life, it can be a little overwhelming and it is easy to get yourselves into debt and other financial trouble.

Most millennials are currently in their 20s and 30s – a time when many young people are ready to make major financial decisions in their lives, like home ownership, long-term investment activity, etc. If you’re currently a part of this generation here’s your crash course on what you should do to improve your financial wellness:

Take online financial courses
Since most young adults have the propensity for technology it is suggested you take a few basic online courses in economics, accounting, and any other financial topics that may be of interest to you.

Embrace Technology
When it comes down to managing your money there is probably an app. To help you do that. These apps. Can categorize your spending habits and help you manage your spending. These insights can help you save money each month and then transfer that money directly to your savings. Online financial apps can help you make a workable budget for your lifestyle and ultimately change your net worth.

When it comes down to managing your money there is probably an app to help you do that. Mobile apps like Clarity Money can help you track any wasteful spending habits. Digit and Stash can recommend where you can save money each month and then transfer that money directly to your savings. Online financial apps can help you make a workable budget for your lifestyle and ultimately change your net worth.

Examine Your Current Bank Accounts
Are you paying fees? If so, for what? Monthly maintenance and minimum balance fees should never be a fee on your account statement. Free checking accounts, are available, especially at credit unions and these accounts will help you keep more of your own money in your pockets. So don’t settle for anything else.

Build Your Credit and Understand the Impact of your Credit Score
Early on, you may only have a student loan or a credit card on your credit report. But now it’s time to start building your credit. Ask your credit union about a Credit Builder Loan to help jumpstart your credit. And if you already have some active loans, make sure you’re making payments on time every month. You’ll need that good credit history when you want to make big purchases in the future like a car, rent an apartment, or get a mortgage for your first home.

It’s also important to know that if you are planning on opening up a business your personal credit may be the defining factor in your ability to access necessary working capital.

Repay Debt Tactically
Since we are on the topic of credit, a lot of young adults have credit cards with very high interest rates. Focus on paying off those debts first! If possible, transfer those balances to a lower-rate credit card. It’s much easier to pay down debt when more is going toward the balance.

Track everything to obtain your whole financial picture
Just as businesses manage their cash flow, individuals need to do the same by tracking their income, expenses, assets and liabilities. There are many online tools to help you like Mint, Quicken and Personal Capital.

Build an Emergency Fund
Unplanned/unfair/unfortunate events can happen in the blink of an eye. You may get in a car accident, have unforeseen medical expenses or lose your job. That’s why it’s important for everyone to have an emergency fund. The best way is to set up an automatic savings plan where you pay yourself first by depositing a portion of your paycheck into a separate savings account. If you forget it’s there you won’t be tempted to spend it.

Create a Long-Term Savings Strategy
An emergency fund is a short-term strategy, but you also can’t forget the big picture. Does your employer offer a matching 401(k)? If so, be sure to take advantage of that opportunity. It’s fundamentally free money, and it’s an investment in your future.

Get yourself a financial mentor
Even though there is an overabundance of information and apps on the Internet to help with your financial security, it is far superior to pick the brain and bounce questions off a trusted friend or colleague. Their pertinent insights will most likely be tailored to your specific requirements.

Use these financial tips listed above to get your finances on track while you’re still young. You’ve got a bright future ahead – so start now and stick with it. Your financial well-being will thank you! Although these tips are targeted at millennials, they’re useful for all ages.

Easy To Learn, Important Finance Courses

The digital age has proven useful in so many ways, from connecting us to faraway near and dear ones to enabling us to learn like we never have earlier. Online classes on personal finance are a great means to stay sharp when it comes to managing your budget and financial future, and these free, easily usable courses are a great way to begin. These courses will help you to manage your money, savings and budget. You will be able to manage debt successfully. It will help you to understand and analyze the choice of insurance products available to you today and why they are so vital. You will have a good acumen of wages, tax, and government benefits. You will learn about consumer rights as well as renting and buying accommodation. These courses will help you to plan for the future.

Personal financial management course offers broad based knowledge and detailed understanding of financial concepts and terms used in daily life for planning out personal finances. Managing your money is difficult, and enormous tuition costs make going back to school simply unrealistic. Fortunately, you don’t have to go back for a degree in personal finance, because plenty of great universities, organizations and non-profits and offer free online personal finance management courses to help you educate yourself all there is to learn about what to do with your pay.

There are many online sites with awesome lessons on everything from setting your priorities, all the way to choosing the right insurance policies and even estate planning. With glossaries and quizzes of key terms, personal financial management is a simple, easy-to-understand course that can help give you the extra boost you require when learning about your finances. The description of this course promises that by the end of the course, you will be able to set objectives, implement plan, and apply your new knowledge for the rest of your life.

Personal financial management course is aimed at improving lives through financial education and it is equipped with tools to answer any and every question you may have. It comprises things like budgeting and saving money during the vacation. There are great websites available for all those looking to streamline their budget and learn a thing or two about finance.

If you have to file for bankruptcy, you would need the debtor education and bankruptcy courses. These high-energy and motivating courses are not only fun, but also they meet all court requirements for pre-discharge debtor education in all states and territories. The latter course teaches you about the types of bankruptcy that can be filed.

A few years ago, a step was added to the bankruptcy filing process. Individuals filing for bankruptcy must take part in an approved credit counseling course before filing for bankruptcy. Also, before you get a discharge at the end of your case, another class on personal financial management must be taken. There are very limited exceptions for both requirements, however very few folks will qualify for them.

Once you have filed for bankruptcy, you are required to complete a debtor education course before you can get your discharge. In addition to the credit counseling need in bankruptcy, debtor education is required. In a nutshell, before you can file for your insolvency, you are required to complete a credit counseling course and before you can receive a discharge, you need to complete a debtor education course.

After your case is filed, you must complete the debtor education course. If you filed for straight bankruptcy, you have to finish it within 60 days of the date assigned for your meeting of creditors. In corporate bankruptcy, it must be completed before you make your last plan payment.

Similar to credit counseling, an approved agency must be used to file your certificate of completion with the court (the course can be completed in person, online or over the phone). If you fail to complete the requirement of debtor education course, the court can close your case without a release and additional fees will have to be paid in order to reopen your case to file your certificate.

The focus of debtor education course is on life post bankruptcy. It educates you on how to manage your money, use credit judiciously, and make the most of your bankruptcy discharge. The primary purpose of debtor education is to educate you on how to make sound and robust financial decisions to prevent bankruptcy in the future.

Since the debtor education course will cover money management techniques, you will still have to create a budget using your income and expenses after bankruptcy. But in contrast to credit counseling (which tries to figure out whether you need to file for bankruptcy), the focus of this course will be primarily in educating you about how to manage your money, budget and use credit wisely after a discharge in bankruptcy is received.